Save time, money; report vehicle discrepancies

Airmen 1st Class Jesse Scheidel and Toivo Tamm, 31st Logistics Readiness Squadron mission generation vehicular equipment maintenance technicians, perform an annual vehicle safety inspection on a government owned vehicle at Aviano Air Base, Italy on Oct. 31, 2016. In addition to annual safety inspections, GOV users must perform an operator check prior to driving the vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran/Released)

Airmen 1st Class Jesse Scheidel and Toivo Tamm, 31st Logistics Readiness Squadron mission generation vehicular equipment maintenance technicians, perform an annual vehicle safety inspection on a government owned vehicle at Aviano Air Base, Italy on Oct. 31, 2016. In addition to annual safety inspections, GOV users must perform an operator check prior to driving the vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran/Released)

Airmen 1st Class Toivo Tamm and Jesse Scheidel, 31st Logistics Readiness Squadron mission generation vehicular equipment maintenance technicians, perform an annual vehicle safety inspection on a government owned vehicle at Aviano Air Base, Italy on Oct. 31, 2016. Routine inspections can help reduce GOV repair time through early detection and remediation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran/Released)

Airmen 1st Class Toivo Tamm and Jesse Scheidel, 31st Logistics Readiness Squadron mission generation vehicular equipment maintenance technicians, perform an annual vehicle safety inspection on a government owned vehicle at Aviano Air Base, Italy on Oct. 31, 2016. Routine inspections can help reduce GOV repair time through early detection and remediation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran/Released)

Airmen 1st Class Jesse Scheidel and Toivo Tamm, 31st Logistics Readiness Squadron mission generation vehicular equipment maintenance technicians, perform an annual vehicle safety inspection on a government owned vehicle at Aviano Air Base, Italy on Oct. 31, 2016. Government owned vehicle users can minimize inspection discrepancies by performing regular operator checks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran/Released)

Airmen 1st Class Jesse Scheidel and Toivo Tamm, 31st Logistics Readiness Squadron mission generation vehicular equipment maintenance technicians, perform an annual vehicle safety inspection on a government owned vehicle at Aviano Air Base, Italy on Oct. 31, 2016. Government owned vehicle users can minimize inspection discrepancies by performing regular operator checks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran/Released)

AVIANO AIR BASE, Italy -- The 31st Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle management flight takes great pride in sustaining and maintaining Aviano’s $74.5 million vehicle fleet.

The flight ensures these vehicles are mission and inspection ready.

In preparation for upcoming inspections, the 31st LRS fleet management maintenance team will visit multiple units to identify vehicle discrepancies and negative trends. The vehicle control program relies on Airmen’s stewardship for the vehicle fleet.

The program helps ensure vehicle users are fully trained to conduct vehicle checks, how to annotate and report defects to vehicle management. Whenever unreported vehicles are brought to vehicle management with defects, they are marked as abuse cases.

In these cases squadrons incur the cost of the damages.

We cannot afford to be complacent with vehicles and equipment, because there are no replacements for them.

Maintenance delays also occur when vehicles are turned in with unreported issues. Given the timeframe for some repairs, it can take longer to get parts required for repairs.

When issues are reported the turnaround time for repairs can be less than 24 hours. This is also an easy and avoidable inspection write-up.

If a discrepancy is found, the driver must be interviewed to explain the defect and help resolve the issue.

Vehicle control officers and vehicle operators must ensure they identify and report defects to the vehicle management customer service section no later than the next duty day.

This early identification is an Air Force Instruction requirement.

Initiating and maintaining the appropriate operator inspection guide and trouble report for each assigned vehicle in accordance with AFI 24-302, paragraph 3.19 and section 7B- Operator’s Inspection Guide and trouble report forms, ensures operator maintenance is performed and vehicle malfunctions are reported to vehicle management.

Let’s showcase that our wing is mission ready for any inspection by working together to alleviate documentation trends. As stewards of the Air Force, we must continue to show pride in even the minor day-to-day tasks that are essential to safe, secure and effective operations. Let’s showcase our discipline and precision so we are on track to providing top-notch logistics support to the warfighters, professional Airmen and an on-going sustainment of all installation missions.