COVID Vaccine Distribution

Current Situation

The Department of Defense COVID-19 vaccine plan involves a standardized and coordinated strategy for prioritizing, distributing, and administering COVID-19 vaccines through a phased approach to vaccinate all Active component, Reserve component, TRICARE Prime and TRICARE Select beneficiaries, retirees, and select DoD civilians and contract personnel authorized to receive immunizations from DoD.

The vaccine is voluntary at this time. Initial quantities of the vaccine are limited and will be distributed on a rolling delivery basis as more vaccines becomes available. You can find more information about DoD’s phased approach in the phases/local timeline section below.

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, and processes and procedures are in place to ensure the vaccine is safe and effective. Vaccines are only available after they are:

  • Demonstrated to be safe and effective in large phase three clinical trials
  • Authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
  • Manufactured and distributed safely and securely

For more information about the safety of the vaccines, view the vaccine safety section below.

Aviano’s Medical Clinic has received initial shipments of COVID-19 vaccines. For more information, view the vaccination sites section below.

DOD COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

The Department of Defense is conducting a coordinated vaccine distribution strategy for prioritizing, and administering COVID-19 vaccines that will strengthen our ability to protect our people, maintain readiness, support the national COVID-19 response, and trust in safe and effective vaccines and vaccination plan.

The allocation and distribution of the vaccine is based on prioritization and includes those providing direct medical care, maintaining essential national security and installation functions, and beneficiaries at the highest risk for developing severe illness from COVID-19.

 

*Note: FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine in individuals 18 years of age and older.

 

Questions and Answers

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The risk for severe illness and death from COVID-19 increases with age, with the greatest risk among those aged 85 or older. Adults of any age with the following conditions are also at increased risk of severe illness: Cancer; chronic kidney disease, COPD; heart disease; weakened immune system; obesity; pregnancy; sickle cell disease; smoking; and type 2 diabetes mellitus. COVID-19 is a new disease. Currently there are limited data and information about the impact of many underlying medical conditions and whether they increase risk. Talk with your provider about your individual risk factors and appropriate precautions.
DoD is confident in the stringent regulatory process and requirements of the FDA. Manufacturers are required to submit their raw data for the FDA to review. Safety, immune response, and efficacy data from the trial stages are submitted to the FDA before they are authorized for use and distribution. Per FDA requirements, DoD will be monitoring and tracking vaccine reports of vaccine side effects through various surveillance activities both internal and external to the DoD.
Because the duration of immunity from natural infection with COVID-19 is unknown, vaccine may have value in protecting people who have already had the disease. Early evidence suggests natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, but more studies are needed to better understand this. Talk with your provider if you have been previously infected with COVID-19.
Drugs and vaccines have to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure that only safe and effective products are available to the American public. During public health emergencies, when there is good scientific reason to believe that a product is safe and is likely to treat or prevent disease, the FDA may authorize its use through an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), even if definitive proof of the effectiveness of the drug or vaccine is not known. FDA pre-licensure approval is considered for treatment or prevention of diseases that are very serious.
Each potential recipient of COVID-19 vaccine will receive a vaccine-specific Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) Fact Sheet for Recipients from the FDA, which will provide the following information:
• Who should and should not receive the vaccine
• That recipients have the choice to receive the vaccine
• Dosage and vaccine series information
• Risks and benefits of the vaccine
• An explanation of what an EUA is and why it is issued
• Any approved available alternatives for preventing COVID-19
• Additional resources
• Basic information on COVID-19, symptoms, and what to discuss with a health care provider before vaccination
The DoD initially expects a limited quantity of COVID-19 vaccine before the end of 2020, and rolling delivery to MTFs and other health care facilities after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves the vaccine for use. When the vaccine becomes available, DoD will follow the CDC’s prioritization guidelines (framework) for distribution. Talk to your provider or local MTF for more details about when vaccine will become available.
The DoD will offer vaccine to civilian and contractor staff with direct patient care and to those who normally receive vaccine for occupational health purposes, as authorized in accordance with DoD regulation. This may include some of those working on installations or depots or arsenals, and we are continuing to refine these populations in preparation for the additional vaccination efforts following vaccination of healthcare workers.
Currently the vaccine will be offered on a voluntary basis only due to its FDA emergency use authorization. When formally licensed by the FDA, however, the DoD may require a vaccine for military personnel or personnel in specific fields, as is the case for the influenza vaccine, but that has not been determined yet at this time.
Yes. As the vaccine will only diminish the pandemic over time, our force health protection measures will continue. We will still need to wear cloth face covings and practice physical distancing to limit the spread of the virus. We will not have enough vaccine initially to vaccinate everyone who wants the vaccine and COVID-19 pandemic risks will continue.

Vaccine Misinformation

  • Vaccine Misinformation

    COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible to face an unprecedented need, and we understand there may be some concern.  To combat misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccine, this list highlights some common myths associated with receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Myth: The COVID-19 vaccine will be mandatory.

    Fact: The COVID-19 vaccine will be distributed on a voluntary basis, which is consistent with the normal process when a vaccine is first issued under Emergency Use Authorization. When formally licensed by the FDA, the DoD may require a vaccine for military personnel or personnel in specific fields, as is the case for the influenza vaccine, but that has not been determined at this time.

    Source: DOD COVID-19 vaccine distribution plan transcript

     

    Myth: The COVID-19 vaccine can give you COVID-19.

    Fact: None of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States use the live virus that causes COVID-19. However, the goal for each of them is to teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

     

    Myth: The COVID-19 vaccine is too new or too rushed to be safe.

    Fact: There are processes and procedures put into place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized for use.  Vaccines for COVID-19 are only available after they are demonstrated to be safe and effective in large phase three clinical trials and authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Though the COVID-19 vaccine has been developed in record time, the development process was in-depth. See Operation Warp Speed for more information.

    Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

     

    Myth: You do not have to wear a mask after you receive the COVID-19 vaccination.

    Fact: The CDC recommends that during the pandemic people wear a mask that covers their nose and mouth when in contact with others outside your household, when in healthcare facilities, and when receiving any vaccine, including a COVID-19 vaccine. It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection. It will still be necessary to wear cloth face coverings, maintain physical distancing and continue other hygiene measures until a large proportion of the population is vaccinated and the vaccine is proven to provide long-term protection. For more information, visit considerations for wearing masks.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

     

    Myth: I do not need to get the COVID-19 vaccine if I have already had COIVD-19.

    Fact: Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, people may be advised to get a COVID-19 vaccine even if they have had the COVID-19 disease before. At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

     

    Myth: I can begin traveling once I receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

    Fact: You cannot immediately start traveling upon receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. Host nation and installation guidance will still apply.  Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

     

    Myth: Vaccines approved through the Emergency Use Authorization are not safe.

    Fact: Drugs and vaccines have to be approved by the FDA to ensure that only safe and effective products are available to the American public. During public health emergencies, when there is good scientific reason to believe that a product is safe and is likely to treat or prevent disease, the FDA may authorize its use through an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA), even if definitive proof of the effectiveness of the drug or vaccine is not known. FDA pre-licensure approval is considered for treatment or prevention of diseases that are very serious, like COVID-19.

    Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

     

    Myth: COVID-19 vaccine will alter your DNA.

    Fact: COVID-19 vaccines are mRNA vaccines, which are a new type of vaccine to protect against infectious diseases. mRNA stands for messenger ribonucleic acid and can most easily be described as instructions for how to make a protein or even just a piece of a protein. mRNA is not able to alter or modify a person’s genetic makeup (DNA). The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enter the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA are kept. This means the mRNA does not affect or interact with our DNA in any way. Instead, COVID-19 vaccines that use mRNA work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop protection (immunity) to disease. Learn more about how COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work. ​

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

     

    Myth: The potential side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine are too risky.

    Fact: Most people will not have serious side effects after being vaccinated. Your arm may be sore, red, or warm to the touch. These symptoms usually go away on their own within a week. Some people report getting a headache or fever when getting a vaccine. These side effects are a sign that your immune system is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. It is working and building up protection to disease. See more here: What to Expect after a COVID-19 Vaccination

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

     

    Myth: I don’t need the flu shot if I receive the COVID-19 vaccination.

    Fact: The CDC believes it’s likely that flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will both be spreading at the same time. That means that getting a flu vaccine is more important than ever. A flu vaccine will not protect you from getting COVID-19, but it can prevent you from getting influenza (flu) at the same time as COVID-19. This can keep you from having a more severe illness.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

COVID 19 Home Page

14 Day Rom Webisite

COVID-19 Prevention

During the vaccination process, Wyverns must continue to observe DoD, CDC, and Italian guidelines to mitigate spread in our community.

  • Wear face coverings
  • Wash hands often
  • Maintain physical distance

COVID-19 Vaccine and Pregnancy

CONTACT INFORMATION

Aviano AB

  • Medical Appointments: 0434-30-5000
  • Dental Appointments: 0434-30-5060
  • Referral Mgmt: 0434-30-5792/5782
  • HBA/BCAC/DCAO: 0434-30-5067
  • TRICARE Service Cntr: 0434-30-5133
  • Patient Liaisons: 0434-30-5408
  • Patient Advocate: 0434-30-5002

Other Numbers:

  • International SOS: +(44) 20-8762-8384 (option 1)
  • International SOS Toll Free (from Italy): 800-915-994
  • 24hr Nurse Advice Line (from Italy): 800-877-660
  • 24hr Translation Service (from Italy): 800-915-994
  • DAVA 24/7 Crisis Line: +(39) 335-801-4927

Social Media:

Facebook.com/AvianoMedicalGroup

Useful Websites:

  • TRICARE www.tricare.mil
  • TRICARE Overseas Program www.tricare-overseas.com
  • TRICARE Europe www.europe.tricare.osd.mil
  • TRICARE Online www.tricareonline.com
  • Wisconsin Physician Services (WPS) Claims Processor www.tricare-overseas.com

Useful Apps:

  • Aviano App: Aviano AB information and directory for medical service numbers and directions to local hospital
  • International SOS: TRICARE translation services
  • 112: GPS capability/provides emergency patient locations to call center agents
  • Emergenze FVG: displays local ER room wait times