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Cop's Corner

AVIANO AIR BASE, Italy -- On July 8, an active duty military member reported that someone had stolen their black road bike with white lettering. The Airman stated they last saw their property on June 17. The active duty military member further stated the bike was properly secured the last time they saw the bike. Securing a bike with a chain may not be enough to properly secure the bike. Consider leaving bikes inside of a locked residence when they are not being used. 

On July 8, an active duty military member reported that someone stole their purple Huffy mountain bike. The Airman reported the mountain bike had a bell attached to it and a sticker saying, "I Love My Bike". The mountain bike was last seen at the bike rack adjacent to the dormitory where the active duty military member resides. The bike was secured with a chain and number lock. The active duty military member who was victimized in this incident took all of the necessary precautions to secure their bike. If you are planning on leaving a bike left unattended, ensure that it is properly secured. Remove the temptation of someone taking your property. 

On July 7, an active duty military member reported that someone had stolen their wallet. The Airman stated their stolen wallet contained a restricted area badge, credit card, club card, Illinois driver's license, $15 and 60 euros. It is extremely important to be mindful of the whereabouts of your wallet when it contains sensitive information like a restricted area badge. Being complacent with your personal information is a dangerous practice to get into and could possibly make you vulnerable to some type of identity theft.

On July 6, an active duty military member reported that someone broke into their vehicle and stole private property. The Airman reported someone stole three booklets of gas coupons, once on July 22 and on two previous occasions. The first two thefts occurred in early and mid June. The active duty military member further stated they secured their vehicle on each occasion. Individuals who break into vehicles will not commit the crime unless there is something of value inside the vehicle. These individuals will "window shop" vehicles looking for valuable items left in plain view. Take the necessary precautions to secure valuables and keep them out of plain view and stop potential criminals from nabbing your valuables. Consider locking up valuables in the glove compartment, center console or even the trunk. Always remember to report incidents of theft immediately to the 31st Security Forces Squadron.

On July 6, an active duty military member reported that someone had stolen their wallet. The Airman reported the stolen wallet contained a debit card, Codice Fiscale, California driver's license, Nevada driver's license, library card and $40. The active duty military member further stated they discovered the property stolen three days prior. Limiting the amount of personal information in your wallet or purse is a good crime prevention measure to practice. Pickpockets and purse snatchers thrive on individuals who carry multiple items of personal information in their wallets and purses. This is a good example of limiting the amount of personal information we carry on a daily basis. One ATM/debit card, a codice fiscal, minimal amounts of cash and a driver's license is all one needs to carry. This will mitigate the damage done buy having your wallet or purse stolen or lost.

On July 6, an active duty military member reported that someone had stolen their Trek 6300 mountain bike. The active duty military member stated they last saw their property on July 1. The mountain bike was left unsecured. This past week there was a dramatic increase on the amount of bikes stolen from active duty service members. Ensure that mountain bikes are properly secured at all times. Consider locking them up in a secured environment out of plain view or in well lit areas.

On June 10, an active duty member reported that unknown individuals where shining flashlights into their house in Vigonovo. The Airman was contacted by these individuals and told they were Polizia and needed to speak with their landlord. Having individuals who state they are Polizia, but are not in uniform, not driving marked cars and carrying firearms can cause anyone to become nervous especially when they are asking you questions. Reporting this to the Police Services Desk was the right thing to do to ensure base personnel are informed of the event.

Aviano All Star Award:
This week's Aviano All Star Award goes to the individual who continuously had gas coupons stolen from their vehicle not once, not twice, but three times. If this type of incident happens to you, do not delay reporting this type of crime. Obviously the thief found out what this individuals car looked like and where they are keeping the goods. Avoid leaving valuable items in plain view. Valuable items that commonly come up missing on and off base include military identification cards, gas coupons, CDs/DVDs, IPods, cell phones and other types of small electronic devices. 

Crime Prevention Tip of the Week:
For too many people, violence is an ordinary way to be entertained, settle arguments, or blow off emotional steam. Violence is the result of an array of forces coming together. Recently, we have come to recognize that exposure to violence in the media can be one of those forces. American children spend more time each week watching TV than engaging in any other activity except sleeping. Violence is not limited to TV; it can be found in music, video games, newspapers, comic books, magazines and movies. Exposure to violence can result in children being less sensitive to the pain and suffering of others, more fearful of the world around them, and more willing to behave aggressively. Children imitate what they see. Take a look at what your children are watching. Remember, most media violence can be turned off.